‘Tube Testers’ Category

Signal Corp I-177 tube tester calibration

This article discusses repair and calibration of the Signal Corp I-177  tube tester.   Serious electrical voltages are present, repairs should only be attempted by a qualified technician. Copyrighted by Bob Putnak, all rights reserved.

Introduction

Signal Corp I-177 tube tester

Signal Corp I-177 tube tester



I-177B with MX949A adapter

I-177B with MX949A adapter

Model I-177 is a very old US Military dynamic mutual conductance tube tester that was used during World War II years.  The War Department Technical Manual is dated August 1944, and the tester calibrated in this article is dated April 1945. The unit is extremely well-built.  Due to its age and high signal voltage, the tester is only suited to test the “antique tubes” and military tubes of its era, and does not even have a 9-pin miniature socket.

MX-949A/U socket adapter kit for I-177 models

MX-949A/U socket adapter kit for I-177 models

The MX-949A/U socket adapter kit (an extra accessory that expands the capability of I-177 models) provides sockets to test “newer” tubes.  That said, the 5.0vac signal voltage of the I-177 tester is not suited for testing many of these newer tubes and can damage small signal tubes or provide less-than-ideal readings.  That said, the I-177 does an excellent job of testing the “antique” tubes of its era.

Repair

The fundamentals for starting the I-177 project: all knobs and the meter itself are indexed at zero, check all resistors and potentiometers for accuracy and replace where necessary , replace the 0.1 mfd capacitor, clean all sockets/switches/leaf-switches/pots/rheostat with Deoxit to the extent possible. I would specifically note that the I-177 has 7 carbon resistors.  Expect that most (if not all) of these carbon resistors will have increased in resistance and will need replaced.  The remaining resistors are either wirewound or precision types, and while they should be tested, it is unlikely that any would be defective.  Inspect all wiring (AC power cord, and also each wire connection at every tube socket pin).  Remove both bulbs (#81 fuse bulb and neon shorts lamp), clean bulb connections and sockets, reinstall.  The #81 fuse bulb must be only a #81 bulb (no substitutes).

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B&K 607 – 667 Tube Tester

BK 607 tube tester

BK 607 tube tester

B&K 607 case

B&K 607 case

This article discusses the solid-state B&K 607 / 667  tube testers.  Both models use the same tube setup data book, and therefore both models are functionally equivalent.    Model 607 will be example shown in this article.  Electrical voltages are present, repairs should only be attempted by a qualified technician. Copyrighted, all rights reserved.

This series was B&K’s clone of the Sencore Mighty Mite TC162.  While the circuits are not 100% identical, they are close enough to be considered functionally identical.  The B&K 607 weighs slightly less than 6-lbs (without setup book or manual), and size dimensions are: 34 cm L x 24.5 cm W x 11 cm D.  The case folds open and easily accommodates a full size 8.5 x 11 inch setup chart and service manual as shown in the photo above.

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Mercury Tube Testers

This article will discuss Mercury tube testers. The Mercury Electronics Corporation of Mineola NY produced a number of tube testers in the 1960s.  All models are small, portable, and lightweight.  Popular models include 990, 1000 / 2000, 1100, 1100A, 1100C, 1101.  Models and comments will be added as I find time.   Electrical voltages are present; repairs should only be attempted by a qualified technician.

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Solid state replacement for #83 tube

I am frequently asked by B&K and Hickok owners to explain how to replace a #83 tube with a solid state version. This question is popular because #83 tubes are scare and expensive. Other benefits are increased reliability (no tube to wear down), less heat generated inside the tester case, and less load on the power transformer. So, if you want to Do-It-Yourself, I will explain how these replacements are made.

I will preface this tutorial with a few caveats: First, this procedure is easier to implement with B&K testers than Hickok testers. Hickok factored in the load that the real #83 tube has on the power transformer, and sometimes you cannot properly set the line without circuit modification. Keep this in mind if you plan to try it with your Hickok — you may be getting in over your head. Hence, substitution may be more effort than it is worth, especially when some Hickok buyers do not want the modification and would have to undo the circuit mods that were made. This leads to the second caveat: not everyone feels that the solid-state substitution works ‘excellent’ in Hickok’s. In fact, some “purists” will not even use a Hickok with a solid-state #83 replacement. They cite the fact that silicon diodes have less voltage drop than a tube rectifier, and feel that the tube test results will not be “pure.”

Personally, I always use a solid-state replacement for B&K testers. For most Hickok, I prefer to use a real #83 tube only because circuit modifications are sometimes necessary, which makes going back to a real #83 difficult for the tube tester owner or future buyer.  This problem is particularly true for the “red-case” Hickok’s.

That said, I have no disapproval with using a solid-state #83 in a Hickok model that lends itself to working well, and have found that any tube “test score” differences are trivial. In my opinion, the people who argue about small test score variations are really over-thinking the purpose of testing a tube — the end-result is NOT a test score, but to ascertain whether the tube will work satisfactory in your circuit. Common sense and practicality are important.

Here it goes…

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Repair & calibration NRI 70 Tube Tester

This article will discuss repair and calibration of the NRI Professional model 70 tube tester. High voltages are present, repairs should only be attempted by a qualified technician. Copyrighted, all rights reserved.

NRI 70 beautiful hardwood case

NRI 70 beautiful hardwood case

Introduction

Built by Precision Apparatus Co for NRI, the high-quality craftsmanship of the NRI Professional model 70 tube tester is readily apparent. It has a beautiful hardwood case (appears to be oak or birch) with finger-joint construction. Eight rubber feet protect your desktop in both the working position and the standup position. Internally, the tester uses a large beefy transformer and quality Pace (Precision Apparatus) meter movement. The tester has very small size, measuring only 10.75 x 10.75 x 6.25 inches (27cm x 27cm x 16cm) and weighs a hefty 10.4 lbs (4.7 kg). Most of the weight is due to the large transformer and hardwood case.

The NRI 70 has eight built-in sockets consisting of 4-pin, 5-pin, 6-pin, 7-pin large, 7-pin miniature, octal, loctal, and 9-pin miniature. All sockets use standard wiring (1-to-1, 2-to-2, etc.), and the control lever numbers correspond to their RTMA pin numbers (Lever 1 controls socket pin 1, Lever 2 control socket pin 2, etc.) (more…)


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